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Raspbmc October update and some big news!

Raspbmc -

Hi everyone,

We didn’t get an update last month as I was very busy with OSMC development. OSMC is doing well and we hope to have our first proper public betas within two weeks for Raspberry Pi. Our installers for Windows, Mac and Linux are ready and you can read more here.

Very shortly, I’ll be launching a flagship piece of hardware that really showcases OSMC. That’s called Vero, and it’s a small, low-power, high performance media player. It’ll be on Kickstarter for crowdfunding shortly, and you won’t be disappointed. I’ve already shown it off on Facebook and Twitter: but only when the Kickstarter goes up will you get all the tech specs. If you were thinking of upgrading an old Pi — you may want to just hold on for a bit there.

Find out more and be the first to know when it’s on Kickstarter by checking out Vero’s site here

On to this month’s update:

  • Add support for the HiFiBerry DAC+ (For Model B+). There is also some progress on getting the Wolfson card supported.
  • Raspbmc will now send its hostname to routers for easier identification
  • Fix for JPEG decode error in Raspbmc Settings addon
  • Removal of Arora web browser to prevent crashes
  • Updated NOOBS image to fix relax loops and provide already updated filesystem
  • Updated standalone image so new users spend less time updating
  • Fix for RT-5370 WiFi not working on NOOBS images
  • Fix for intermittent issues booting NFS and USB installs (initramfs)
  • Fix an issue when installing Raspbmc via OSX Yosemite
  • AirPlay fixes for iOS 8
  • Fix issues that occur with audio playback on incomplete DTS frames
  • Updated Pulse-Eight CEC library to version 2.2
  • Full fix for the Shellshock vulnerability
  • memcpy/memset optimisations in kernel space

To get the update, all you need to do is reboot your Raspberry Pi. If you’re running an XBMC nightly, be sure to switch to ‘xbmc release’ in Raspbmc Settings to get back on the stable build.

If you enjoy Raspbmc, and this update, and would like to support continued development (which will help OSMC too), you can make a donation here. I’d appreciate it if you can spread the word about Vero — it’s going to need all the support it can get!

Enjoy!

How To Update Raspbian On Your Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi Spy -

If you are running Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi you should update it regularly to ensure all the software packages are up-to-date.

It may take ten minutes but it’s generally quicker if you do it regularly as there will be fewer updates to install each time.

First you should update the list of packages and their details on your Pi :

sudo apt-get -y update

Then you can update the packages themselves :

sudo apt-get -y upgrade

The software referred to as the Pi’s “firmware” is included as a package so will also be updated using the above commands.

Latest Firmware Version (Optional)

If you want to update the firmware to the latest experimental version you can use the rpi-update utility. You should run the commands above then update the utility using :

sudo apt-get install rpi-update

then :

sudo rpi-update

You shouldn’t need to use the latest firmware unless you’ve got a specific reason to do so.

The above process will update packages that are already installed. If a new package is added to the latest image you will either need to install it manually, or re-image your SD card with a fresh image download.

If I’m starting a new project or experiment I tend to re-image my card to ensure I’ve got the latest packages.

RasPiComm+ finalized, Indiegogo campain preparation

Daniel Amesberger (RasPiComm) -

It has been some time since the last post about the RasPiComm+, but be assured, we were very busy and have put huge efforts in finalizing the product and I can now proudly say that we are ready for production.

We are launching a Indiegogo campaign mid-November 2014, so please spread the word!

So here is an update and/or introduction for those who have not heard about the RasPiComm+ before.

The RasPiComm+ is an extension platform for the Raspberry Pi which offers an arbitrary combination of up to 4 modules. The huge difference to other extension boards out there is not only the flexibility of using exactly the modules you need but also that all modules come with full linux driver support. I’ll do separate posts showing that in detail, including videos.

 

Connection to the Raspberry Pi

You may have noticed that the header has 2×14 pins which is uncommon. That is easy to explain: The RasPiComm+ is backwards compatible to the Raspberry Pi B, but also supports the EEPROM functionality for the Raspberry Pi B+, so the inner 2 pins are unused on the B version. When you are using the B+ version, the EEPROM of the RasPiComm+ can be accessed from the Raspberry Pi.

So how does it work now?

You just plug in the modules you need (see below for available modules).

The easiest way to install the firmware and drivers is in online (the Raspberry Pi is connected to the Internet). Just run the script “./rpc+setup” and you’re done. You can now access serial devices via /dev/rttyRPC+0 to /dev/rttyRPC+3 depending on the  module slot. I/Os are mapped to /sys/class/gpio just like the GPIOs of the Raspberry Pi are. That means you can reuse software that access the GPIOs of the Raspberry Pi directly. Special interfaces which are not digital pins or serial devices (like for example analog inputs or displays) are mapped in files in the /proc/rpc+/module1-3 folders. See the documentation of your modules to see how to access the resources from the Raspberry Pi. In the next posts I will show you some examples on how to use various modules, from I/Os, serial ports, sending and receiving SMS messages to sending a bitmap to a Sharp Memory LCD.

What does the script do exactly?
  1. First, it checks if there is a base firmware on the RasPiComm+, if not it downloads and installs it
  2. Then it scans all 4 module slots and reads the EEPROM IDs to identify which modules are plugged in
  3. In the next step a request to our buildserver is made to request the firmware configuration for the ARM microcontroller and the CPLD
  4. The firmware is then built by our buildserver and the firmware package is downloaded, the files are stored in a local cache on your Raspberry Pi so you do not need to be online if you wish to reinstall the same configuration again
  5. The script programs the ARM and then the CPLD firmware
  6. Then the corresponding drivers are loaded
  7. Done. You can now access all modules from your Raspberry Pi

 

Web Firmware configurator

You do not need to use the automated script. You can also select the modules manually and download the firmware. This also enables you to download the sourcecode for the firmware.

If you install the Unity 3d plugin (http://unity3d.com/webplayer) you can see a beautiful 3d visualization of your configuration.

We are currently also working on a case generator. When it is ready you can also auto-generate a STL file used by 3d printers with exactly the openings you need for your selected modules. You can then print it on your 3d printer or send the file to a company offering 3d printing as a service like www.shapeways.com

The modules

We already have quite some modules available for the start, and we are currently testing a lot more.

Modules available:

  • 8 Input (5-35V)
  • 8 Output (5-35V)
  • 8 Analog Input (12 bit)
  • 4 Relays
  • RS-485/RS-485-4 wire/RS-422
  • GPS
  • GSM
  • Profibus
  • Sharp Memory Display

Modules we work on:

  • 1-Wire
  • 16 Isolated I/Os (24V)
  • Stepper Motor
  • CAN
  • KNX
  • 6LoWPAN
  • 433MHz
  • 868MHz
  • 9-Axis MEMS (3 axis gyro, accelerometer and magnetometer)

Each module has an EEPROM to identify itself. The installer uses this to request the correct firmware. There is also user-space available on the EEPROM, you can store data like counter values if you want to.

More posts are coming. In the next one I’ll quickly show you some simple scenarios how to use modules and how easy it is to script functionality.

Another post will I’ll do more in-depth explanation on how the RasPiComm+ works internally and why we made certain design decisions.

After that I will do a post on how easy you can hack the RasPiComm+ and compile your own firmware code based on the boilerplate code, to run it standalone (without the Raspberry Pi) for example or do ultra-fast switching logic with the CPLD without CPU intervention or implement additional functionality on the ARM processor with the GNU C compiler.


Gameboy Halloween costume

Raspberry Pi -

The good people at Adafruit pointed us at this video. Besides the fact that the costume is driven by a Raspberry Pi, we don’t know much about the build (or the guy who made it – he goes by MikeHandidate on YouTube, but we suspect that’s not actually his name) – good though, isn’t it?

More Halloween goodies to come tomorrow. Are you using a Pi in your costume or house decorations this year?

How To Use Wavemon To Monitor Your WiFi Connection

Raspberry Pi Spy -

While experimenting with an Edimax WiFi dongle on my Raspberry Pi I wanted an easy method to monitor the wireless signal strength as I moved around the house.

The Pi was running from a USB power bank and sometimes this can result in the WiFi dongle dropping the signal. It’s hard to trouble-shoot WiFi issues so I went looking for a simple utility that would constantly report the status of the connection.

Eventually I found a utility called Wavemon. It’s free, easy to install and does exactly what I needed.

Installation

To install Wavemon use the following command :

sudo apt-get install -y wavemon Launching

You can run Wavemon from the command line after the Pi has booted or from within a LXTerminal window once you have launched LXDE using “startx” using :

wavemon

This will present you with the main screen :

The toolbar along the bottom shows the pages available. Each one is associated with a function key.

F2 displays a graph of you signal levels. The graph below was created using the “random data” setting in the preferences to make it a bit more exciting.

F3 lists the wireless networks visible to your Pi as well as the signal strength and the channel they are using.

F7 displays the preferences page. These can be left at the default values but I changed the “override scale autodetect” to “on” and increased the signal level maximum to 30dBm. This allowed the graph on the “F2:lhist” to correctly display the signal level from my connection which was averaging 20dBm and initially off the top of the screen.

F8 displays the help screen. There isn’t much there at the moment!

F9 will display the author and licence details.

F10 (or the letter Q) will quit the utility and return you to the command line.

Alternative Method

For a really quick snapshot of your WiFi performance you can use :

iwconfig

which will give you something like :

wlan0 IEEE 802.11bg ESSID:"TheMatrix" Nickname:"<WIFI@REALTEK>" Mode:Managed Freq:2.427 GHz Access Point: 00:18:4D:10:49:C6 Bit Rate:54 Mb/s Sensitivity:0/0 Retry:off RTS thr:off Fragment thr:off Power Management:off Link Quality=98/100 Signal level=83/100 Noise level=0/100 Rx invalid nwid:0 Rx invalid crypt:0 Rx invalid frag:0 Tx excessive retries:0 Invalid misc:0 Missed beacon:0 Wavemon Configuration File

The configuration file is located in :

/home/pi/.wavemonrc

and can be edited directly using :

sudo nano .wavemonrc

You don’t need to edit it manually. I include the information just in case you wanted to!

Pi Talks at PyConUK

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You may remember our Education team attended PyConUK in Coventry last month. We ran the Education Track, which involved giving workshops to teachers and running a Raspberry Jam day for kids at the weekend. We also gave talks on the main developer track of the conference.

Carrie Anne gave a fantastic keynote entitled Miss Adventures in Raspberry Pi wherein she spoke of her journey through teaching the new computing curriculum with Raspberry Pi, attending PyConUK the last two years, being hired by the Foundation, and everything she’s done in her role as Education Pioneer.

See the keynote slides here

I also gave my talk PyPi (not that one) – Python on the Raspberry Pi showing interesting Pi projects that use Python and demonstrating what you can do with a Pi that you can’t on other computers.

See the talk slides here

Alex gave his talk Teaching children to program Python with the Pyland game - a project Alex led over the summer with a group of interns at the Computer Lab.

See the talk slides here

The conference ended with a sprint day where Alex led a team building and testing Pyland and adding challenges, and I worked with a group of developers porting Minecraft Pi to Python 3.

If you missed it last week, we posted Annabel’s Goblin Detector, a Father-daughter project the 8 year old demonstrated at PyConUK while enjoying the Raspberry Jam day.

Real-time depth perception with the Compute Module

Raspberry Pi -

Liz: We’ve got a number of good friends at Argon Design, a tech consultancy in Cambridge. (James Adams, our Director of Hardware, used to work there; as did my friend from the time of Noah, @eyebrowsofpower; the disgustingly clever Peter de Rivaz, who wrote Penguins Puzzle, is an Argon employee; and Steve Barlow, who heads Argon up, used to run AlphaMosaic, which became Broadcom’s Cambridge arm, and employed several of the people who work at Pi Towers back in the day.)

We gave the Argon team a Compute Module to play with this summer, and they set David Barker, one of their interns, to work with it. Here’s what he came up with: thanks David, and thanks Argon!

This summer I spent 11 weeks interning at a local tech company called Argon Design, working with the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module. “Local” in this case means Cambridge, UK, where I am currently studying for a mathematics degree. I found the experience extremely valuable and a lot of fun, and I have learnt a great deal about the hardware side of the Raspberry Pi. And here I would like to share a bit of what I did.

My assignment was to develop an example of real-time video processing on the Raspberry Pi. Argon know a lot about the Pi and its capabilities and are experts in real-time video processing, and we wanted to create something which would demonstrate both. The problem we settled on was depth perception using the two cameras on the Compute Module. The CTO, Steve Barlow, who has a good knowledge of stereo depth algorithms gave me a Python implementation of a suitable one.

The algorithm we used is a variant of one which is widely used in video compression. The basic idea is to divide each frame into small blocks and to find the best match with blocks from other frames – this tells us how far the block has moved between the two images. The video version is designed to detect motion, so it tries to match against the previous few frames. Meanwhile, the depth perception version tries to match the left and right camera images against each other, allowing it to measure the parallax between the two images.

The other main difference from video compression is that we used a different measure of correlation between blocks. The one we used is designed to work well in the presence of sharp edges and when the exposure differs between the cameras. This means that it is considerably more accurate, at the cost of being more expensive to calculate.

When I arrived, my first task was to translate this algorithm from Python to C, to see what sort of speeds we could reasonably expect. While doing this, I made several algorithmic improvements. This turned out to be extremely successful – the final C version was over 1000 times as fast as the original Python version, on the same hardware! However, even with this much improvement, it was still taking around a second to process a moderate-sized image on the Pi’s ARM core. Clearly another approach was needed.

There are two other processors on the Pi: a dual-core video processing unit called the VPU and a 12-core GPU, both of which are part of the VideoCore block. They both run at a relatively slow 250MHz, but are designed in such a way that they are actually much faster than the ARM core for video and imaging tasks. The team at Argon has done a lot of VideoCore programming and is familiar with how to get the best out of these processors. So I set about rewriting the program, from C into VPU assembler. This sped up the processing on the Pi to around 90 milliseconds. Dropping the size of the image slightly, we eventually managed to get the whole process – get image from cameras, process on VPU, display on screen – to run at 12fps. Not bad for 11 weeks’ work!

I also coded up a demonstration app, which can do green-screen-free background removal, as well as producing false-colour depth maps. There are screenshots below; the results are not exactly perfect, but we are aware of several ways in which this could be improved. This was simply a matter of not having enough time – implementing the algorithm to the standard of a commercial product, rather than a proof-of-concept, would have taken quite a bit longer than the time I had for my internship.

To demonstrate our results, we ran the algorithm on a standard image pair produced by the University of Tsukuba. Below are the test images, the exact depth map, and our calculated one.

We also set up a simple scene in our office to test the results on some slightly more “real-world” data:

However, programming wasn’t the only task I had. I also got to design and build a camera mount, which was quite a culture shock compared to the software work I’m used to.

Liz: I know that stereo vision is something a lot of compute module customers have been interested in exploring. David has made a more technical write-up of this case study available on Argon’s website for those of you who want to look at this problem in more…depth. (Sorry.)

 

Making a Unicorn HAT

Raspberry Pi -

Our good friends at Pimoroni have made a very sparkly HAT. We thought you’d like to see where unicorns come from.

The Unicorn HAT is available at Pimoroni for £24 – get them while they’re warm (but not hot)! Clive’s busy writing a graphics resource for learners featuring this particular HAT – watch this space for more details.

Scooter with blinkenlights

Raspberry Pi -

Alex Markley, a programmer, writer and comedian, has a young relative who, thanks to a Model A Raspberry Pi, some Adafruit Neopixels, some sensors and a scooter is currently the world’s happiest nine-year-old.

I asked Alex if he’s written the project up – he says he’s working on it. We’ll add a link to any build instructions he produces as soon as they’re available.

Robot volcanology

Raspberry Pi -

Earlier this week, we talked about Raspberry Pi robots under the sofa. Today, we’ve got a Raspberry Pi robot under a volcano to show you.

Dr Carolyn Parcheta studied volcanology in Hawaii, and now works as a NASA postdoctoral fellow in Pasadena. Her particular area of study is the geometry of volcanic fissure vents: something that’s very hard to map, because they’re inaccessibly narrow, coated with sharp glass from eruptions, and are often destroyed when magma flows through them.

Learning about that geometry is crucial in building an understanding of how eruptions work: how magma flows, and how gas escapes. So with the help of a Raspberry Pi, Dr Parcheta has built a wall-climbing robot to go where humans can’t, and is using it to model cracks and vents in much more detail than has been possible before.

She made this video about the project for a National Geographic award last month, where she placed in the finals.

Dr Parcheta’s eventual goal is to 3d-map all of the fissures in Kilauea, an active volcano on Hawaii. There are 54 in all, and she completed maps of two in May this year. We’ll be keeping an eye on her progress – and on the progress of that brave little robot!

Eben at Techcrunch Disrupt

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Eben was speaking at TechCrunch Disrupt in London yesterday, where he had a display board and HAT to show off, and some other bits of news. You’ll get to see a PiTop (a laptop kit that’s currently going great guns on Indiegogo), be tantalised with some details about the A+, and learn about what we think is important if you’re growing a hardware business: enjoy!

 

ToyCollect. A robot under the sofa.

Raspberry Pi -

On Saturday December 6 (we’re letting you know ahead of time so you’ve got absolutely no excuse for not finishing your build in time), there’s going to be a special event at the Cambridge Raspberry Jam, held at the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Astronomy. Pi Wars is a robot competition: unlike the televised Robot Wars you’ve seen in the past, though, nobody’s robot is going to be destroyed. There are a number of challenges to compete in (none of which involve circular saws, which will please some of you and sadden others), some additional prizes for things like innovation and feature-richness – along with the Jim Darby Prize for Excessive Blinkiness, and more. We’re absurdly excited about it. You can listen to Mike Horne, the organiser of the Cam Jam (and writer of The Raspberry Pi Pod blog, and occasional helper-outer at Pi Towers) explain more about what’ll happen on the day, on this episode of the Raspi Today podcast.

Mike’s expecting people to come from all over the country (it’s amazing how far people travel to come to the Cam Jam – I bumped into friends from Sheffield and from Devon at the last one). It should be a blast. We hope to see you there.

I was thinking about Pi Wars this morning, when an email arrived from Austria, complete with some robot video. Dr Alexander Seewald used a Raspberry Pi and an Arduino to build a tiny little robot, small enough to fit under the sofa, to rummage around and rescue his two-year-old daughter’s lost toys. (I do not have a two-year-old daughter, but I do have cats, who take great delight in hiding things under the sofa. Once, horrifyingly, we found a mummified burger down there. It had been some months since we’d eaten burgers. I could use one of these robots.)

The robot has a Pi camera on the front, with a nice bright LED, so the operator (using a tablet) can see where the bits of LEGO are. The voiceover’s in German, but even if you don’t speak the language you should be able to get a clear idea of what’s going on here.

Dr Seewald has made complete instructions available, so you can make your own ToyCollect robot: there’s everything you need from a parts list to code on his website (in English). It’s a nice, complete project to get you started on building a robot that has some use around the house – let us know if you attempt your own. And see you at Pi Wars!

Seeking the next Alan Turing – the Bebras Computational Thinking Challenge

Raspberry Pi -

Last week saw the London Film Festival open with the premier of The Imitation Game, a film which chronicles the awe-inspiring work of Alan Turing cracking the German naval Enigma machine at Bletchley Park, Britain’s code breaking centre during WWII.

Alan Turing was a man of startling intellect and one of the founding fathers of computer science. After his work at Bletchley, Alan Turing went on to make significant contributions to the development of ACE (Automatic Computing Engine) at National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and later on the Manchester Mark 1 at Manchester University. Turing was a mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, philosopher, computer scientist, mathematical biologist, and also a marathon and ultra-distance runner (all qualities to which I can only aspire and fail to measure up on every count). Of course, the tragedy of his life is how he was persecuted and prosecuted for his sexuality, which ultimately led to him taking his own life. This injustice was eventually recognised by the British Government in 2012, leading to a posthumous pardon by HM Queen Elizabeth in 2013. To this day Alan Turing remains one of the most notable figures in the development of computing in the UK.

As an undergraduate at King’s College Cambridge, Alan Turing studied mathematics. It was during this time he did his seminal work on computation. Turing devised a methodology of describing hypothetical abstract machines, and demonstrated such machines are capable of performing any mathematical computation if it could be represented as an algorithmTuring machines are a central object of study in the theory of computation. Building on this earlier work in 1949 Turing proposed an experiment, the Turing test. In this test Turing attempted to understand and define the basis of machine “intelligence”. Turing’s assertion was that a computational device could be said to be “intelligent” if a human interrogator could not distinguish between the responses from the machine and that of another human being, through conversation alone. To this day the Turing test continues to spark debate around the meaning of artificial intelligence, so in homage of his work we’ve created an educational resource – a whole scheme of work for KS2 and KS3 – for teachers to explore the Turing experiment.

At Bletchley, Turing had a bit of a reputation. He was nicknamed “The Prof” in recognition of his curious mannerism, his intellect and his understanding of computation. Here at Pi Towers, we are keen on all things computing, and we are always looking for ways to grow the next generation of Turings, so in conjunction with ARM Holdings and Oxford University we are proud to support and sponsor the UK Bebras Computational Thinking Challenge.

The Bebras Computational Thinking Challenge is open to all schools in the UK, for pupils from Year 2 to Year 13, and runs during the week beginning November 10. The challenge is free to enter, takes about 40 minutes and is completed online. If you are not sure what to expect, you can have a go at questions from previous year’s competitions here, but if you are interested in taking part in this year’s competition your school must register by October 31. Not in the UK ? Don’t worry, this is only the UK chapter of an international competition, so you can find out your national organising body at the Bebras site under countries.

RaspberryPi: Mein neuer Pi

sparky0815 -

Nun bin ich ebenfalls ein stolzer Besitzer des RaspberryPi B+ Er ist für mich etwas ganz besonderes, da er von Eben Upton selbst signiert wurde. Ein Dank von mir geht direkt an die Foundation. Zusätzlich habe ich noch etwas seeehr colles dazu bekommen. Es handelt sich um Aufkleber mit dem RaspberryPi Logo.

RACHEL-Pi – delivering education worldwide

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Liz: If you’re a regular reader, you’ll have noticed more and more frequent mentions over the last year of a piece of kit called RACHEL-Pi. RACHEL is an offline server, run on a Raspberry Pi, full of educational content from teaching curriculums, Khan Academy materials, Wikipedia, classic literature, reference material and textbooks; alongside vital community materials like medical and first aid textbooks.

We’re very proud to be able to support World Possible’s RACHEL-Pi project through our education fund. It’s being used all over the world in remote places where the internet is unavailable – and this year it’s gone from strength to strength. Here’s Jeremy Schwartz, the Executive Director of World Possible, to show you what they’ve been doing with the project in the last year.

What an incredible 12 months it has been. World Possible has seen RACHEL-Pi (our Raspberry Pi-based educational server) deployed in scores of countries – often in the most remote of locations – delivering a world of educational content to tens of thousands of students previously far removed from the great online learning tools those of us reading this blog take for granted almost every day.

How’d we get here?

It’s worth taking a few seconds to get some history on World Possible’s RACHEL server. In 2009, World Possible (an all-volunteer team, mostly from Cisco) curated a package of creative commons resources (Wikipedia, Khan Academy, CK12 textbooks, and much more) for offline distribution. Coupling the content with open-source web server software, we could create “Remote Area Community Hotspots for Education and Learning,” (“R.A.C.H.E.L.”) – a locally cached web server accessed through any connected web browser (with no need for internet connectivity).

RACHEL is accessed via a web browser

Probably more naïve than anything, an attempted round of pilot projects of RACHEL (which at the time was a power-hungry NAS device) in 2009, in Sierra Leone, failed in pretty dramatic fashion.

The failure took a real toll on World Possible and forced us to rethink RACHEL distribution, ultimately building a distribution network of partnerships with on-the-ground teams that could do the hard part for us, and many of which still lead the RACHEL distribution charge today:

UConnect in Uganda and East Africa more broadly – read more

Powering Potential in Tanzania – watch RACHEL being taught; read more

EVCOAfrica in West Africa – watch Seth introduce RACHEL

Despite the early successes of those groups, we still didn’t have the final piece of the puzzle that has exploded RACHEL deployment today (development of open-source educational resources + uniform standards of web browsers + proliferation of low cost computing hardware and storage). In comes the Raspberry Pi, giving us the ability to create a plug-and-play webserver and hotspot at a price point that we can distribute to masses of people without any required computer literacy background.

Is it working? – “Content is king; distribution is King Kong”

Almost exactly a year ago, a partnership with the Gates-Backed Riecken Libraries in Guatemala and Honduras, as well as a funding leap of faith by a few loved donors and the Rotary Club of Portola/Woodside Valley (CA), allowed us to launch a new phase of World Possible and RACHEL-Pi focused on creating, curating, and distributing relevant content from and within disconnected communities. A good old fashioned sneaker-net, delivering locally relevant (and often locally created) digital educational content to disconnected schools, libraries, orphanages and community centers.

The World Possible team in Guatemala is now led by Israel Quic, a native Mayan, initially attracted to RACHEL-Pi as a means of preserving and teaching his Mayan heritage and language to local communities.

Israel Quic presents RACHEL at Campus Tec, the technology department of University de la Valle

Israel quickly saw an opportunity to collect more locally relevant agricultural and political resources than we currently distribute as part of our Spanish-language RACHEL-Pi. In April, the fruits of his labor truly began to sprout, when word came from one agricultural community, an early RACHEL-Pi recipient, which built a drip irrigation system out of old plastic bottles after discovering how to do it from a single teacher’s smartphone while researching our Guatemalan content on their RACHEL-Pi.

A drip irrigation system made from old plastic bottles, using how-to content from RACHEL-Pi

The successes only caused us to redouble our efforts. Aided by our local Facebook page, World Possible Guatemala solicits offers of help and requests for RACHEL from across the country.

Current RACHEL-Pi installations in Guatemala

Installations of RACHEL-Pi in community centers and libraries are often made available 24/7, enabling anyone with a smart phone to come learn, research, and explore.

San Lucas Toliman RACHEL-Pi wifi access point

Facebook post of Biblioteca Comunitaria Rija’tzuul Na’ooj

San Juan del Obispo in Sacatapequéz is an agricultural community where middle school kids are using RACHEL to learn not only how to grow and irrigate, but also how to cultivate mushrooms and make fresh peach jam. Along the way they get business skills as well.

The mission in Guatemala is still just beginning, but the lessons learned and successes are providing a key roadmap for World Possible. Make available valuable educational resources, supplement them with locally relevant vocational and cultural content, get buy-in from local community volunteers, and distribute… distribute… distribute. The results are truly inspirational.

What’s next? – “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

Globally, the RACHEL effort is still driven by the hundreds of groups that download RACHEL and distribute independently in their own communities. Everything we do is free to download through our website, FTP site, BitTorrent sync, or even shared Dropbox. The Raspberry Pi has also made it so anyone can do this on their own, a powerful democratization of access to a world-class education.

World Possible will continue to support these groups through our own volunteer network, through independent advice, and by creating the best package of content available. Even more today, a biweekly newsletter is connecting thousands of RACHEL advocates in nearly 40 countries who have been through the process and can provide best practices to new users locally.

What excites us most is our ability to replicate the successes that have been achieved in Guatemala. In Micronesia, Professor Hosman and her students curated a RACHEL for the state of Chuuk. She’s now working with Inveneo to deploy RACHEL to the entire region’s network of schools.

Grace, a teacher at Akoyikoyi School in Chuuk, receives a RACHEL-Pi

In Kenya and East Africa, thanks to a generous grant from this very Raspberry Pi Foundation, we’ve just completed a hire (Bonface Masaviru) to follow the roadmap that Israel Quic laid out in Guatemala. Bonface is spreading RACHEL throughout Kenyan schools…

… and working with local volunteers such as Zack Matere to help us curate RACHEL Shamba (an offline package of farming resources):

Where we can, we’ll look to our long-time distribution partners to help create full labs to access RACHEL-Pi. Here in Uganda, Romeo Rodriguez gives his “children” their first ever look at technology in a new library thanks to a full “digital library-in-a-box” from World Possible.

We’ll continue to find ways to hire additional country managers, local to their communities, who have proven their dedication to RACHEL, to involve indigenous people in creating and distributing the content they currently lack.

If you’d like to be part of the mission, we’d love to have you. A great group of development volunteers can be reached at rachelproject@googlegroups.com. If you have networking expertise, we can pair you with a group that might need your help deploying RACHEL – info@worldpossible.org.

If you want to join the Raspberry Pi Foundation in supporting our efforts financially, we’d love it – donate here.

If you want us to come talk to your group, or help deploy RACHEL, we’d love that also – please don’t hesitate to get involved! Thank you to all of the individuals and groups who already have; there is so much more we can do together.

Compute Module IO Board Hardware Design Files Now Available!

Raspberry Pi -

Back in April we announced the Compute Module, and since then we’ve had a lot of interest from manufacturers who are looking to design the module into real products. We’ve already had orders for significant numbers of modules.

It has taken a little while to spin up the wheels of mass production, but they are now well and truly turning, and behind the scenes our initial customers who have already made orders are now getting their modules. Now that production is in full swing, Compute Modules will soon be available to the masses from the usual partners, for $30 in volumes of 100 or more, or individually if you pay a premium. Premier Farnell have the ability to back-order here and RS Components here.

When we announced the Compute Module we released all the schematics for the module itself and also the schematics for our ‘get you started’ Compute Module development board, the Compute Module IO Board. We had always promised to also release the full CAD for the IO board, and today we are doing just that!

Compute Module IO Board as viewed in the CAD tool

The design files are the Cadence OrCAD schematic file, Cadence Allegro PCB file and the full board Gerbers, bill of materials (BOM) and PDF version of the schematic. People should be able to take the design and easily modify it, or just take the Gerber files and create copies of the board if that’s what they want to do.

As a bonus we are also releasing the full CAD for the Camera and Display adaptors as well.

These design files can be found here and are released under a modified BSD licence (the licence is included in the zip with the design files).

Note that the only difference from the official Raspberry Pi Compute Module IO Board is that this publicly released one does not (and cannot, without permission from Raspberry Pi) have the Raspberry Pi logo on it. We have also removed the CE and FCC compliance logos, as again this is something board manufacturers are responsible for: you must perform your own certification for any clones or derivatives of this board.

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